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Get to know SABA's officer slate!

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 18, 2017
  • Online voting will open mid-June
  • Members will receive emailed instructions on how to cast their vote 

 

Meet the members on the 2016-2017 Officer Slate! 

 

2016-2017 Office Slate:

President-Elect —Santos Vargas

Vice President —Tom Crosley 

Secretary (choose one) —David Evans

Treasurer —Ty Sheehan

Directors (choose four) — Jason Bashara; Mike DeNuccio; Erica Giese; Danielle Hargrove; Rebeca Martinez; Mike McCrum; Lawrence Morales, II; John "Bud" Ritenour; Brian Steward

 

President-Elect — Santos Vargas

 

Davis & Santos, P.C.

Business Litigation

Syracuse University College of Law, 2004 

 

Vargas is a Fellow of the Texas and the San Antonio Bar Foundations. He serves on the State Bar of Texas’ Local Bar Services Committee and William S. Sessions American Inns of Court and has been recognized in Texas Super Lawyers Rising Star (2015-Present).

 

Why vote for me? I am a partner at Davis & Santos, P.C., where I run a practice focused on business litigation matters. I currently serve as the Vice President of the San Antonio Bar Association and have previously served as Secretary, Treasurer and Director. In addition to serving on the board of the San Antonio Bar Association, I have previously served as President of the San Antonio Young Lawyers Association. I have recently been selected to serve as the Chair of the State Bar of Texas’ Local Bar Services Committee, which organizes the annual Texas Bar Leaders Conference and provides support to local bar associations throughout the state of Texas. In addition to my activities in the legal community, I am a graduate of Class 34 of Leadership San Antonio, which is co-sponsored by the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce and the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. I plan to draw upon my extensive leadership experience with the San Antonio Bar Association, and other organizations, to diligently and faithfully carry out the duties of President of the San Antonio Bar Association.

 

Vice President — Tom Crosley

 

Crosley Law Firm

Board Certified in Personal Injury Trial Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, and as a Civil Trial Advocate by the National Board of Trial Advocacy

University of Houston, 1992

 

Crosley’s involvement with bar activities is extensive. He was President of the San Antonio Trial Lawyers Association in 2002 and in 2001 served under appointment by the Bexar County Commissioners Court to the Advisory Board for the Bexar County Dispute Resolution Center until 2006. Crosley is a member of numerous legal organizations, including the American Association for Justice. He is an active member of the Texas Trial Lawyers Association (Director 2005-present, Advocates Director 1999-2001), the San Antonio Trial Lawyers Association (Director 2000-2001, President 2002), the American Board of Trial Advocates, San Antonio Chapter (inducted 2004, Secretary 2014, Treasurer 2014, Vice President 2015, President-Elect 2016 and President 2017), the American Bar Association, the Texas Young Lawyers Association (Director 1997-2001), the San Antonio Bar Association (Secretary 2016-2017, Treasurer 2015-2016, Director 2004-2006 and 2013- 2016), the San Antonio Young Lawyers Association (Director 1997-2001, Vice President 2000) and the American Inns of Court. He is also a Life Fellow of the Texas and San Antonio Bar Foundations.

 

Crosley has been selected as a Texas Super Lawyer each year since 2004 and has been named one of the Top 50 Lawyers in Central and West Texas by that publication for the last several years. He regularly writes and speaks at CLE conferences on topics related to personal injury trial law.

 

Why vote for me? Besides being the first attorney to electronically file a pleading in Bexar County years ago, I have continued to push for improvements and ways to streamline tedious processes to better advance the tasks ahead—both within my own office and with the organizations that I take part in. I enjoy learning about new technology in the legal field and the ways that we can all benefit from it. 

 

Secretary — David Evans

 

Attorney & Counselor at Law

Commercial & Employment Litigation

University of Texas School of Law, 2001

 

David Evans is currently finishing his term as Treasurer for the San Antonio Bar Association. Evans also serves on the Board of the San Antonio Chapter of Habitat for Humanity.

 

Evans has been included in various lists voted on by his peers over the years, including Texas Super Lawyers and Best Lawyers in America. He received a President’s Award from former SABA President Andy Kerr for his ability to pull off a CLE on beer law at a brewery. His kids, Sophia and Shepherd, would say that his buttermilkbiscuit-making skills are strong to very strong. The mock trialers he coached would probably say he always shows up, almost always with pizza (which cannot be underestimated when trying to work with high school students).

 

Why vote for me? I’d be honored to serve as your Secretary on the SABA Board. I have served on the Board for several years, so I have an institutional knowledge about all the many great things SABA does for its members and the community at large. But, I also know that—like any membership organization—SABA can always make things better by making its members’ lives—personal and professional— easier. As Secretary, I can do this by making sure information about SABA is kept up to date and easily accessible, and I would love to develop an app for members (an idea I have been kicking around for a long time, and an idea whose time hopefully has come now).

 

Treasurer — Ty Sheehan

 

Hornberger Fuller & Garza Incorporated Corporate

Securities and Real Estate Law

St. Mary’s University School of Law, 2006

 

Sheehan is a member and current Board Member of the San Antonio Bar Association and the Witte Society of the Witte Museum. He is a Fellow of the Texas and San Antonio Bar Foundations, former President and Board Member of the San Antonio Young Lawyers Association and a former Board Member of the Leadership Organization of Professionals (LOOP) and the Young Texans Against Cancer. Sheehan is a member of the Corporate Governance Committee of the American Bar Association Business Law Section and the Subcommittee on Securities Law of the American Bar Association Business Law Section. Sheehan is also a member of various other community and conservation organizations.

 

In 2017, Sheehan was selected as a Texas Super Lawyers Rising Star, and in 2015 was named by Scene in SA Magazine in “Best Lawyers in San Antonio,” for corporate attorneys for lawyers practicing between 5 and 15 years. In 2015, Sheehan was selected as the Distinguished Young Alumnus for St. Mary’s University School of Law by the St. Mary’s University School of Law Alumni Association, an award given annually to only one former graduate. He is the former Immediate Past President (2013), President (2012), PresidentElect (2011), Vice President, Secretary, and member of the Board of Directors of the San Antonio Young Lawyers Association and was selected for and has completed the Leadership Development Program of the Real Estate Council of San Antonio. Sheehan has been a speaker at CLE luncheons related to negotiating mergers and acquisitions, equity compensation and negotiating real estate transactions. He graduated summa cum laude (top 2%) from St. Mary’s University School of Law, was an Associate Editor for the St. Mary’s Law Journal and was selected as a member of the John M. Harlan Society (for high academic achievement in the study of law).

 

Why vote for me? I was born and raised in San Antonio, attended law school here and have practiced law here since the start of my career, and San Antonio is where I’ll stay. This community is important to me. My grandparents and friends live here, as well as my coworkers and most of my clients. I hope that my record of involvement with various organizations in this community, and in particular in the San Antonio legal community, reflect the way I feel about this town and our local bar. If elected Treasurer, I’m confident I will be a capable and prudent steward of the Association and Foundation funds and will provide able financial oversight, budgeting and reporting for our Board and our members. Serving as an active member of the Board for the last two years has given me thorough knowledge and understanding of the organizations’ financial reports and important financial ratios, budgets and controls. I regularly work with staff and have good, personal experience working with current and incoming members of the Board. I hope to continue to contribute to the Association and Foundation for many years to come. Thank you for your consideration.

 

Directors (four spots available) — Candidate A: Jason S. Bashara

 

Law Offices of Jason S. Bashara

Family Law

St. Mary’s University School of Law, 2002 

 

Bashara is a former President of the San Antonio Family Law Association and a Fellow in the Texas Bar Foundation. He has been recognized in S.A. Best Lawyers by Scene in S.A. Magazine (2015-2016), Super Lawyers in Texas Super Lawyers, Thomson Reuters Legal Division (2014-2016) and as a Top Attorneys Texas’ Outstanding Young Lawyers by Texas Monthly (April 2014).

 

Candidate B: Mike DeNuccio

 

Curney, Farmer, House & Osuna, P.C.

Civil Litigation

St. Mary’s University School of Law, 2008

 

DeNuccio is a member of the San Antonio Bar Association and the San Antonio Young Lawyers Association.

 

DeNuccio is the former President of San Antonio Young Lawyers Association. He received the Inaugural 10 Under 10 from St. Mary’s University School of Law (2017) and was featured in Best Lawyers in San Antonio (2012).

 

Why vote for me? I have been an active member of the San Antonio legal community since I started law school in 2005. After graduation, I continued serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the San Antonio Young Lawyers Association (SAYLA), eventually being elected President (probably the oldest President in the organization’s history). One of my goals as President was to improve the relationship between SAYLA and SABA and we started by joining forces to bring the popular SABA Chili Cook-off and SAYLA Family Fun Day together. Now that I have aged out of SAYLA, I would like to continue to serve as a member of the SABA Board. My legal career has been interesting with many changes along the way, but SAYLA and SABA (and the many mentors I have met through them) have been very helpful to a “young” attorney looking to find his way. My work history, work ethic, dedication and drive are assets that I hope to bring to the SABA Board and hopefully will help other lawyers along the way. I respectfully and humbly request your vote.

 

Candidate C: Erica Giese

 

U.S. Attorney’s Office Federal Criminal Law

Prosecution

St. Mary’s University School of Law, 2002

 

Giese is a current Board Member of the Mexican American Bar Association – San Antonio Chapter and a member of the Hispanic National Bar Association (2015-present), St. Mary’s University School of Law Alumni Association, Federal Bar Association – San Antonio Chapter, Bexar County Women’s Bar Association, President–Elect of the Del Rio Association of Federal Lawyers, Federal Bar Association, Houston Bar Association, Texas District and County Attorney’s Association (2012-2006) and the San Antonio Bar Association. She serves on the Federal Courts Committee, the Law School Committee and the Diversity in the Profession Committee (2010-2013). She was an Advisor of the National District Attorney’s Association Border Prosecutions Course Planning Committee (2012) and has been admitted to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals (2009), Western District of Texas (2006) and the State Bar of Texas (2002).

 

Giese is an Ambassador to Law Schools, Department of Justice (2015-present). She received the EOUSA Director’s Award for Superior Performance as an Assistant United States Attorney – Criminal, Executive Office of the United States Attorney (2014) and was featured in the Women in Law Issue of the Federal Lawyer (2014). She’s been recognized at the Federal Bar Association Inaugural Women in the Law Conference (2014) and has been the recipient of the Department of Justice Student Loan Repayment Program Award (2009, 2011, 2012 and 2013), the San Antonio Hispanic Bar Association Scholarship (2002), the Marianist Spirit Richard Green Award for Community Building – The Center for Legal and Social Justice (2002) and the St. Mary’s University School of Law Pro Bono Achievement Award (2002).

 

Why vote for me? I can’t recall a time when I didn’t work. At twelve, I began baby-sitting. That experience taught me patience and responsibility. At thirteen, I worked at my uncle’s video store. Although some of you may be too young to remember what those were like, working there taught me to be observant, helpful and direct—be kind and rewind, please! At fifteen, I started my own small business called Demos by Denise. I demoed products across grocery stores in south and central Texas and convinced stores to commit to buying and stocking the product I demonstrated. This job taught me to be a good salesperson and communicator. I learned the gift of salesmanship and honed my ability to convince someone to spend their hard earned money on boxes of cookies and crackers. While managing the business, I learned to balance a checkbook and file taxes, too! I haven’t stopped working since then, all the while learning the valuable lesson that building a reputation as a hard and committed worker pays dividends for years to come. I am committed to continuing this tradition as a Board Member for the San Antonio Bar Association.

 

Candidate D: Danielle Hargrove

 

Private Practice

ADR, Labor and Employment

The University of Texas School of Law, 1991

 

Hargrove is a member of the San Antonio Bar Association, Association of Corporate Counsel and the Corporate Counsel Women of Color.

 

Hargrove is a former Director of the San Antonio Bar Association (2012 – 2014), Past President of San Antonio Black Lawyers’ Association, Former Officer and Board member of the Bexar County Women’s Bar Association and past recipient of its Belva Lockwood Outstanding Young Lawyer Award in 1996. She is a former member of the Advisory Board for the Bexar County Dispute Resolution Center, Former Secretary of African American Lawyers Section of the State Bar of Texas and the SBOT ADR Council. Hargrove also served two full terms on the State Bar Grievance Committee and as Panel Chair. Although currently inactive, she has been a Sustaining Fellow of the Texas Bar Foundation for many years. She has recently exhausted term limits on the Board of the Carver Development Board, a 501(c)3 organization tasked to undertake fundraising activities and to provide financial, programming and advisory support to the Carver Community Cultural Center, a San Antonio arts treasure. She was also appointed by then Mayor Phil Hardberger to serve on the San Antonio Housing Authority as its Vice Chair. She is especially proud of being a singer, dancer, and “feather woman” extraordinaire whenever possible in Ethics Follies.

 

Why vote for me? I have served on many committees and in numerous leadership capacities at the national, state and local bar levels. My practice has included service as a military JAG, providing legal assistance to service members, as a prosecutor and Assistant US Attorney. I’ve worked at small to large firms in associate and “of counsel” capacities, had two in-house corporate stints, and I have also worked solo, focusing on labor and employment matters and growing my ADR practice as a mediator and arbitrator. I respectfully ask for your vote for a much more personal reason. I was humbled and honored to be elected to the Board in 2012. It is a little known fact that I became the first African American woman on the Board in the organization’s then 114-year history. I was especially proud. However, tremendous professional and personal obligations constrained me from continuing a consecutive term as most board members do. Nevertheless, my desire to serve this Bar and our community has never waned. I still have work to do. I respectfully request your vote and opportunity to continue. I have the time and energy to dedicate to the Bar and the communities we serve. 

 

Candidate E: Rebeca Martinez

 

Fourth Court of Appeals

Boston University School of Law, 1992

 

Martinez serves on the Board of the National Association of Women Judges, the San Antonio Bar Association and the Mexican American Bar Association. She is a Election Edition Subpoena 7 NEWSLETTER Election Edition A CELEBRATION OF THE RULE OF LAW member of the College of the State Bar, Pro Bono College and William S. Sessions Inns of Court and serves on the Texas Center for the Judiciary, Curriculum Committee.

 

Martinez has received the Faculty Award from Boston University School of Law. She is currently serving as Chair of the National Association of Women Judges 2018 Annual Conference. She is a Sustaining Life Fellow of the Texas Bar Foundation and a Fellow of the San Antonio Bar Association.

 

Why vote for me? I am the proud daughter of Antonio F. Martinez, a Vietnam War veteran, and his wife of over 55 years, Manuela. I have lived in military bases around the country, moving to Corpus Christi just before my father’s retirement. I graduated from Incarnate Word Academy with honors, from Southern Methodist University as a University Scholar and from Boston University School of Law as the recipient of the Faculty Award. I clerked with a U.S. Magistrate Judge, the 13th Court of Appeals and the prestigious Boston law firm, Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky & Popeo, P.C. My private practice began with Thornton Summers Biechlin Dunham & Brown, followed by a personal injury practice before I opened my own litigation firm, which I ran for more than 15 years. I was elected to the Fourth Court of Appeals in 2012. I’ve been an active member of SABA and various committees, including Law Week, as well as of the Bexar County Women’s Bar, the Mexican American Bar and the National Association of Women Judges. 

 

Candidate F: Mike McCrum

 

McCrum Law Office

Criminal Defense

St. Mary’s University School of Law, 1985

 

McCrum is a member of the San Antonio Bar Association and a Fellow of the San Antonio and Texas Bar Foundations and the Texas Litigation Counsel of America. He is a member of the American Bar Association, Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association and the San Antonio Federal Bar Association.

 

He is a member of the “Criminal Justice Act” Panel Classification Committee, appointed by San Antonio Division federal district judges. He serves as Vice Chairman of the U.S. Magistrate Judge Selection Committee, San Antonio Division, Western District of Texas, and received the Outstanding Performance Award (1995, 1998, 1999, 2000) U.S. Attorney Office, Western District of Texas. He’s also received the U.S. Attorney General Certification of Appreciation (1999), U.S. Attorney General Volunteer Service Award (1996), U.S. Attorney Office, WDTX, Special Act Award (1993) and the Drug Enforcement Administration Certificate of Appreciation (1992, 1994 and 1996).

 

Why vote for me? A few lines about me from Alexander Hamilton & friends:

What’s your name, man?

Michael McCrum

My name is M-i-c-h-a-e-l M-c-C-r-u-m.

How’s a bastard, orphan, son of a b****, and a Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten spot in the Caribbean by providence, impoverished, in squalor grow up to want to be a SABA Director?

Be careful about my mother; she’s one of the greatest people I’ve ever known. Aside from that, it’s true my dad left when I was three, but I’m not a Scotsman, I’m a Mexican. I actually grew up in the south side of San Antonio, not the Caribbean, and although you say it’s a “forgotten” place, I’ll never forget the lessons I learned there. As for the bastard part, I don’t think I am, but others can judge that.

To what do you owe reaching this point in your career?

I got a lot farther by working a lot harder, by being a self-starter. I started retreatin’ and readin’ every treatise on the shelf. I could never back down. I never learned to take my time. I put a pencil to my temple, connected it to my brain, and wrote refrain after refrain, striving to keep it all sane.

You have a 32-year career in law, what’s left for you to do?

There’s a million things I haven’t done, but just you wait, just you wait.

 

Candidate G: Lawrence Morales, II

 

The Morales Firm, P.C.

Employment law and general litigation, Board Certified in Labor and Employment Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization

Baylor Law School, 2005

 

Morales is a member of the American Bar Association, ABA Labor and Employment Section, San Antonio Trial Lawyers Association, Texas Cowboys Alumni Association at the University of Texas at Austin and Order of the Alamo.

 

Morales is a Law Clerk to the Honorable Priscilla Owen of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. He was the highest ranking graduate in his law school class and was selected as the 2017 Outstanding Lawyer by the Business Journal, Super Lawyer (2015-2017) and Texas Rising Stars (2011-2015). He is a Fellow to the Federal Labor Standards Committee of the American Bar Association and is a published author in the Texas Bar Journal, San Antonio Lawyer Magazine and The Advocate.

 

Why vote for me? As the namesake of an attorney who has practiced in San Antonio for nearly 40 years, it is entirely possible that you may accidentally vote for me, thinking that you are voting for my dad. I am not so naïve to believe that this would be the first time I have benefited from the name and respect that my dad has earned during his career. However, aside from being my dad’s son, I hope that you vote for me because I understand that, like how our city is the smallest big town in America, our bar has a unique familial quality. While zealously representing our clients, our members manage to treat their colleagues with respect and professionalism. Our members understand that how we conduct ourselves is likely the only interaction with the justice system our clients will experience firsthand, and consequently, integrity and honor are fundamental to the rule of law. If elected, I will work to preserve this unique quality in our Bar so that one day I can pass it on intact to my kids.

 

Candidate H: John "Bud" Ritenour

 

The Ritenour Law Firm, P.C.

Criminal Defense, Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization

St. Mary’s University School of Law, 1995

 

Ritenour is a member of the San Antonio Bar Association, Texas Bar College, San Antonio Criminal Defense Lawyers Association (SACDLA), Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association (TCDLA), National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) and the American Bar Association.

 

Ritenour is a Past President of the San Antonio Criminal Defense Lawyers Association (SACDLA), Co-Recipient of the Kim Young Lawyer of the Year Award (2013, SACDLA) and CoRecipient of the Percy Foreman Lawyer of the Year Award (2013, TCDLA).

 

Why vote for me? I am a solo Criminal Defense Lawyer. I am as proud of that as I am that I served 27 years active duty with the United States Air Force, retiring as a Colonel in the communications-computer field—all before going to law school. I have practiced at all levels of Texas state courts, the United States District Court, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of the United States. I was cocounsel in Trevino v. Thaler, 569 U.S. __, 133 S.Ct. 1911 (2013), a death penalty habeas corpus case decided favorably to Mr. Trevino. I co-chair the SABA Criminal Law and Procedure Committee. I am chair the Bexar County Public Defender Oversight Board. So, with all that criminal law stuff, why do I ask for your vote to be on the Board of SABA? Because I believe a strong Bar should include the experiences of, and provide opportunities for, both civil and criminal practitioners. There are differences, but interacting and understanding can only enhance the professionalism of all. As an Air Force supervisor and Commander, I brought diverse skills together to accomplish a mission. I’d like to help do the same with the San Antonio Bar.

 

Candidate I: Brian Steward

 

Ketterman, Rowland & Westlund

Board Certified in Personal Injury Trial Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. Member of the American Board of Trial Advocates.

St. Mary’s School of Law, 1990

 

Steward is a member of the American Association for Justice, American Board of Trial Advocates, San Antonio Trial Lawyers Association, San Antonio Black Lawyers Association, Texas Freedom Network and American And Texas Civil Liberties Union. Steward also serves as a Director of the Texas Trial Lawyers Association.

 

Steward has received William S. Session Chapter of American Inns of Court. He’s been named a Texas Super Lawyer and has been recognized in Best Lawyers by Scene in S.A. Magazine (2005-present). He is Chair of the Medical Legal Liaison Committee of the San Antonio Bar Association (2015-present) and has been Chair of the State Bar of Texas Grievance Committee (2011-2014), the State Bar of Texas Committee (2013) and the Duke Alumni Admissions Commitee – San Antonio Chapter. Steward has served as the San Antonio Trial Lawyers Director (1991-1995 and 2010-present) and as President of the Alumni Council of San Antonio Academy (2004-2005). He has served as a Board Member of the State Bar of Texas Grievance Committee (2008-2014), San Antonio Academy, Child Advocates of Texas (2007-2010) and is a Board Member of the San Antonio Public Library Foundation (2015 to present). Steward was the Presenter of the Advanced Personal Injury Seminar (2016) and is currently the Course Director (2017).

 

Why vote for me? I believe that I would be an asset to the incoming Bar president Beth Watkins and her administration because of my legal experience, dedication of community service and continued involvement in this honorable profession. As an experienced lawyer, I have watched the Bar evolve into a more inclusive entity and this process must continue. As a citizen, I believe that community service, especially to children and those pursing higher education, is of paramount importance, and the Bar can play a greater role in that pursuit. As one dedicated to this pro - fession and the protection of its image, I think that the Bar has the platform to enhance the community’s view of this profession while also providing those in need with legal services and advice under various existing and contemplated programs. I hope to utilize my legal and community experiences to assist the Bar leadership in the continued growth while also maintaining a unique perspective on this profession. Like Liam Neeson in Taken, “…I do have a particular set of skills…skills I have acquired over a long career.” I am ready to serve.

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San Antonio Bar Association Board of Directors announces June Moynihan as new Executive Director in May leadership change

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 16, 2017

On behalf of the Board of Directors, President Bobby Barrera announced May 16, 2017 the promotion of Assistant Executive Director June Morse Moynihan to Executive Director of the San Antonio Bar Association (SABA) effective immediately. Moynihan previously served as Membership Director and San Antonio Bar Foundation Director before being promoted four months ago to Assistant Executive Director. She has been with the San Antonio Bar for more than two years and has extensive knowledge of the organization’s inner-workings, including its membership services, continuing legal education programming, Foundation counterparts and community service projects.

 

“It’s an exciting change for the San Antonio Bar,” said President Bobby Barrera. “The Board and I are delighted to welcome June’s vision to center stage. We have been continuously impressed with her skill set, and I’m confident in her abilities to continue strengthening our Bar in the years to come.”

 

During Moynihan’s tenure at the SABA, she has set and achieved some of the largest fundraising goals in the organization’s history; revitalized the Foundation Fellows Program; reorganized the Bar’s pro bono project, the Community Justice Program, as Interim Director; led efforts in the SABA’s Raising the Bar initiative and recent strategic planning; and most recently won a State Bar of Texas Star of Achievement Award for her flagship project Law Week 2016.

 

“Bobby and I agree that June’s enthusiasm and can-do spirit are some of her greatest assets,” said Immediate-Past President Marty Truss. “I worked with her closely during my time as President and look forward to the new ideas and strong leadership she’ll bring to the Bar and its programs.”  

 

Originally from San Francisco, CA, Moynihan graduated from the University of California Hastings College of the Law and was admitted to the bar in 1994. She has been in the San Antonio area for seven years where she enjoys gardening in the Texas heat and spending time with her husband and two kids. 

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State Bar of Texas to hold runoff for president-elect; Sally Pretorius of Dallas named president-elect of TYLA

Posted By Administration, Thursday, May 4, 2017

Texas attorneys will be able to vote for Chad Baruch of Dallas or Joe K. Longley of Austin in a runoff election for State Bar of Texas president-elect.

 

Baruch and Longley were the top two vote-getters in a month-long, three-way race for the position that ended May 2. Longley received 41.46 percent of the 27,190 votes cast while Baruch received 30.02 percent. Laura Bellegie Sharp of Austin received 27.96 percent. Write-in candidates composed nearly 0.56 percent of the votes cast.

Since no candidate received a majority of votes, the runoff election for president-elect will be held May 11 through 5 p.m. CT May 25. The winner will serve as president of the State Bar of Texas from June 2018 to June 2019.

 

Chad Baruch

A longtime solo practitioner, Baruch is now a shareholder in Johnston Tobey Baruch in Dallas. He is board certified in civil appellate law. 

Baruch has served on the State Bar Board of Directors and as chair of the Texas Bar College, Consumer & Commercial Law Section, and Individual Rights & Responsibilities Section. 

A frequent continuing legal education speaker, Baruch received the 2015 State Bar of Texas Gene Cavin Award for lifetime contributions to CLE and the 2016 Texas Bar Foundation Dan Rugeley Price Memorial Award for excellence in legal writing and commitment to the profession. The Texas Access to Justice Commission has named him a Pro Bono Champion. 

Alongside his legal career, Baruch has served as a college and high school head basketball coach and government teacher. He received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and his law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School.

 

Joe K. Longley

As a solo practitioner, Longley has been prolific throughout his legal career in helping pass laws that benefit lawyers and their clients.  

In 1973, Longley co-authored and nurtured the passage of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices-Consumer Protection Act, together with the private remedies sections of Article 21.21 (Now Chapter 541) of the Texas Insurance Code. Since then, he has co-authored Chapters 542 (prompt pay) and 544 (unfair discrimination) of the Insurance Code, the Texas Fair Debt Collections Practices Act, the Texas Home Solicitation Act, and landlord-tenant protections. 

Longley has authored numerous seminar papers, taught insurance law at the University of Texas School of Law, and served on the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors, the District 9 Grievance Committee, and as chair of the State Bar Consumer Law Section, now called the Consumer and Commercial Law Section. In 2011, he received the State Bar Insurance Law Section’s Insurance Legend Award. 

Longley and his wife, Maggie, have three grown children and five grandchildren.

 

State Bar Board of Directors

 

In other results, the following individuals were elected to the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors:

 

Neil D. Kelly, Houston, District 4, Place 2; K. Nicole Voyles, Houston, District 4, Place 6; Jerry C. Alexander, Dallas, District 6, Place 3; David C. Kent, Dallas, District 6, Place 4; Leslie W. Dippel, Austin, District 9, Place 1; Robert E. McKnight, Jr., Victoria, District 11; Alison W. Colvin, Brownsville, District 12; Amie S. Peace, Denton, District 14; Aldo R. Lopez, El Paso, District 17. 

 

There will be a runoff for the District 4, Place 4 seat. Cynthia Owens and Dinesh H. Singhal, both of Houston, were the top two vote-getters in that race. Voting begins May 11. 

 

Texas Young Lawyers Association Election

 

In the Texas Young Lawyers Association election, Sally Pretorius of Dallas was elected president-elect and will serve as TYLA president from June 2018 to June 2019. Pretorius received 55.28 percent of the 5,009 votes cast; her opponent, Jenny Lee Smith of Austin, received 43.64 percent. Write-in candidates composed 1.08 percent of the votes cast.

 

Sally Pretorius is board certified in family law and is an associate at KoonsFuller in Dallas. She is the current vice president of the TYLA Board of Directors. 

 

Pretorius previously served on the TYLA board’s Executive Committee as secretary 2015-2016. She earned the Director of the Year Award in 2014 and the First Year Director of the Year Award in 2013. She has led or participated in numerous TYLA service projects, including the Divorce Guide (for teenagers and children); Strength in Unity; Pregnancy and the Workplace; Educating Educators; A Lawyer’s Guide to Social Media; the Family Law Toolkit; and A Welcoming Home: Be a Foster Family. Pretorius also chaired the National Trial Competition and served on the Health and Fitness Initiative Committee.  

 

She is a member of the Dallas Association of Young Lawyers, the Junior League of Dallas, and the Dallas Museum of Art Junior Associates. She was listed in Super Lawyers 2014-2016. 

 

Outside of the courtroom, Pretorius enjoys running, spinning, and spending time with her husband, Adam; miniature Dachshund; and rescue German Short Hair Pointer. She graduated from Southern Methodist University in 2009. 

 

The following individuals were elected to the TYLA Board of Directors:  

 

Ricky Shelton, Hughes Springs, District 1; Matthew L. Harris, Lubbock, District 3; Lindsay Forbes Billups, Dallas, District 5, Place 1; Andy Jones, Dallas, District 5, Place 3; Joel T. Towner, Houston, District 6, Place 3; Arthur L. Bryan, II, Houston, District 6, Place 5; Rachel L. Grove, Beaumont, District 7; Susan F. Smith, Fort Worth, District 10, Place 1; Erin R. Clegg, Lewisville, District 11; Lauren Renee Sepulveda, Pharr, District 13; Sara Anne Giddings, San Angelo, District 15; Rebecca Patterson Linehan, Midland, District 17; J. Barrett Shipp, San Antonio, District 18, Place 1; Jonathan Garcia, Laredo, District 19; Jonathan Zendeh Del, Galveston, District 21 

 

There will be runoffs for two TYLA director seats. In District 8, Place 1, Katherine “Katie” Fillmore and Meagan T. Harding, both of Austin, were the top two vote-getters. In District 9, Savannah Stroud of Killeen and Matthew L. Czimskey of Waco will advance to the runoff.  

 

Detailed election results are available at texasbar.com/election.

 

Media Note: High-resolution photos of the president-elect candidates are available upon request.

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2017-2018 Officer slate and call for nominations

Posted By Administration, Monday, April 24, 2017

SABA announces the following nominees for the 2016-2017 Board of Directors:

 

President-Elect – Santos Vargas

Vice President – Tom Crosley

Secretary – David Evans

Treasurer ­– Ty Sheehan

 

Directors –

Jason Bashara

Mike DeNuccio

Erica Giese

Danielle Hargrove

Rebeca Martinez

Mike McCrum

Lawrence Morales, II

Bud Ritenour

Brian Steward

 

Other nominations may be made by submitting a written petition signed by 25 members of the Association submitting the name or names of other members to be placed on the list of nominees. Petitions must be received in hand by the Bar's Executive Director, Larkin Chenault, at the San Antonio Bar Association (100 Dolorosa, Suite 500; San Antonio, Texas 78205) no later than 5:00 p.m. May 15, 2017. 

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SBOT President-Elect Race

Posted By Administration, Thursday, March 2, 2017

State Bar of Texas certifies petition candidate for president-elect race

 

Joe K. Longley of Austin will join Chad Baruch of Dallas and Laura Bellegie Sharp of Austin as a candidate for president-elect of the State Bar of Texas.

 

On February 28, Longley was approved as a petition candidate after submitting 5,332 eligible signatures from State Bar members, gaining him a place on the ballot. Under the State Bar Act, any member of the bar meeting certain eligibility requirements may run for president-elect by submitting a petition signed by at least 5 percent of the State Bar membership.

 

State Bar members will vote April 3 to May 2, and election results will be announced May 2. The winner will serve as president of the State Bar of Texas from June 2018 to June 2019.

 

Joe K. Longley is a solo practitioner in Austin, specializing in consumer and policyholder class actions. His Austin office overlooks the UT Tower and the Capitol.

 

In 1973, Longley co-authored and nurtured the passage of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices-Consumer Protection Act, together with the private remedies sections of Article 21.21 (Now Chapter 541) of the Texas Insurance Code. Since then, he has co-authored Chapters 542 (prompt pay) and 544 (unfair discrimination) of the Insurance Code, the Texas Fair Debt Collections Practices Act, the Texas Home Solicitation Act, and landlord-tenant protections.

 

Longley has authored numerous seminar papers, taught insurance law at the University of Texas School of Law, and served on the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors, the District 9 Grievance Committee, and as chair of the State Bar Consumer Law Section, now called the Consumer and Commercial Law Section. In 2011, he received the State Bar Insurance Law Section’s Insurance Legend Award.

 

Longley and his wife, Maggie, have three grown children and have been blessed with five grandchildren.

As previously announced, the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors on January 20 approved the nominations of attorneys Chad Baruch of Dallas and Laura Bellegie Sharp of Austin as candidates for president-elect.

 

Chad Baruch is certified in civil appellate law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. A longtime solo practitioner, Baruch is now a shareholder in Johnston Tobey Baruch in Dallas.

 

Baruch has served as a member of the State Bar Board of Directors and Executive Committee and as chair of the Texas Bar College, Council of Chairs, Consumer and Commercial Law Section, and Individual Rights and Responsibilities Section.

 

A frequent continuing legal education speaker, Baruch received the 2015 State Bar of Texas Gene Cavin Award for lifetime contributions to CLE and the 2016 Texas Bar Foundation Dan Rugeley Price Memorial Award for excellence in legal writing and commitment to the profession. The Texas Access to Justice Commission has named him a Pro Bono Champion.

 

Alongside his legal career, Baruch has served as a college and high school head basketball coach and government teacher. He received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota and his law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School.

 

Laura Bellegie Sharp is an AV-rated trial attorney handling all forms of litigation for the Sharp Firm in Austin.

Sharp has served on the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors and the State Bar of Texas Insurance Trust Board of Directors and is a current member of the board of the Texas Board of Legal Specialization. Sharp was a member of the bar’s Court Rules Committee, the Grievance Committee, and the Women in the Profession Committee. She is a Texas Bar Foundation life fellow and a member of the Texas Trial Lawyers Association.

 

Sharp was the 2003-2004 president of the Austin Bar Association and held director and officer positions from 1998 to 2003. She is a founding fellow of the Austin Bar Foundation, having served twice as chair, and continues to serve as treasurer. She has been a delegate to the American Bar Association House of Delegates since 2008, is on the board of the National Conference of Bar Foundations, and is an American Bar Foundation life fellow.

 

Sharp received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and a J.D. from Baylor Law School.

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In Memoriam: Chief Justice Jack Pope

Posted By Administration, Monday, February 27, 2017

Jack Pope 1913-2017 from Osler McCarthy on Vimeo.

 

 

Texas Supreme Court advisory

Contact: Osler McCarthy, staff attorney/public information
512.463.1441 or email
Twitter: @OslerSCTX

CHIEF JUSTICE JACK POPE, 1913-2017

 

View an online video tribute

Retired Texas Chief Justice Jack Pope, who helped establish formal judicial education for Texas judges, fought for a voluntary judicial-ethics code when judges had none and fought again to make that code mandatory and enforceable, died Saturday at 103. He served Texas for 38 years as a district court judge, court of appeals justice and on the Supreme Court, the last two as chief justice.

 

His judicial tenure, as a whole, was the longest of any Texas Supreme Court justice.

 

“Chief Justice Jack Pope was a judicial icon,” Chief Justice Nathan L. Hecht said. “His hard work, scholarship, common sense, humor, and integrity are legendary. No Texas judge has ever been more committed to serving the rule of law and the cause of justice. He was my mentor, role model, counselor, and most especially, my friend. Texas has lost a great, great man.”

 

As a court of appeals justice, Pope’s reassessment of water rights conveyed by Spanish and Mexican land grants changed Texas water law forever. As chief justice he forged a way to guarantee income to finance legal assistance for the poor. Concerned with double litigation in the same case, he won legislative support for statutory changes to thwart “forum shopping” for favorable judges.

 

“I’m a common-law lawyer,” he proudly would proclaim, his right hand jabbing at the air, his voice emphatic in the way Jack Pope’s could get emphatic when his passions ran high about the law and judging. “And I was a common-law judge.”

 

The common law is the wisdom tested by the ages, he believed, but for him it was more than that. “This is history and it’s why the poor man, or the black man, is treated the same as all others,” he said.

 

By the time he retired in 1985, he wrote 1,032 opinions – a record then in Texas, by his reckoning. Two of them are considered among the most-important opinions in the state’s history.

 

“Common-law opinions,” he once said, proudly.

 

With his chiseled features and shock of white hair, Hollywood could not have cast a better judge.

 

Two sons survive him, Andrew Jackson Pope III and Walter Allen Pope, and three grandchildren.

 

His wife of 66 years, Allene Nichols Pope, died in 2004. On the back of her headstone at the Texas State Cemetery he had inscribed: “Allene is the difference between deeds and wishes, finishing and quitting, success and failure.”

 

“He devoted his life not only to the efficient administration of justice, but also to ensuring that justice is available to all,” former Chief Justice Wallace B. Jefferson said. “Jack Pope will be remembered as second to none in the annals of Texas law.”

 

One of his law clerks, former state Rep. Dan Branch of Highland Park, used the analogy of the old Olympics figure-skating scoring method to congeal the Pope legend. “Whether judging him as a man or a jurist or legal scholar or writer,” Branch said, “whatever aspect of his life, I’d hold up a 10.”

 

“Judge Pope was such a legend in the law, such a respected jurist,” said another law clerk, Gwendolyn M. Bookman, a political science professor at Bennett College in North Carolina, who believes she was the first African-American woman to clerk for the Court. “Certainly working for and with him was the greatest honor of my career.”

 

The sweep of his reforms and his opinions changed Texas law forever, said Austin attorney Steve McConnico, also a former law clerk. “What he did for trial practitioners, there’s no way to measure it. …

 

“He really studied the law. If Roscoe Pound wrote something, he read it. If Cardozo wrote something, he read it.”

 

Senior U.S. Circuit Judge Thomas Reavley, a former Texas Supreme Court justice, did not hesitate to name the best jurist among hundreds with whom he served in a judicial career extending six decades, including judges on all but one of the 11 federal regional circuits.

 

“Jack Pope,” he said.

 

Andrew Jackson Pope Jr. was born to Dr. A.J. and Ruth Pope in Abilene in 1913, the year Henry Ford revolutionized automobile manufacturing with the assembly line and the year road-builders completed the first coast-to-coast paved highway.

 

Pope graduated in 1934 from what was then Abilene Christian College. In a sense, he never left his hometown, serving for years as a trustee on the Abilene Christian University board. Most of his library and papers were donated to the university.

 

He earned his law degree from the University of Texas in 1938 and began law practice in Corpus Christi under an uncle’s tutelage. The library table that was his first desk in his uncle’s office sat as the centerpiece of his Austin study.

 

On one corner rested the standup Royal typewriter Pope used as a judge to collect and express his thoughts, then, in his retirement, his memoirs, a family history and a tribute he published to honor a coterie of dedicated care-givers he depended on in his later years.

 

Following a stint in the Navy in World War II, Pope took his first bench in Corpus Christi in 1946, on the 94th District Court, and served for four years.

 

In 1951 he left for the San Antonio Court of Appeals, having beaten three contenders without a runoff in the all-important Democratic primary, becoming, he said, the first justice on the court from south of San Antonio. He served on that court for 14 years until his election to the Supreme Court of Texas in 1964.

 

A lifelong Democrat, he won his seat on the Court also in a three-way primary without a runoff when Texas was essentially a one-party state. He never had opposition for re-election to the court of appeals or Supreme Court.

 

But his appointment as chief justice to succeed Joe Greenhill might have been his greatest political triumph. By his recollection, Gov. Bill Clements, the first Republican governor since Reconstruction and a lame duck defeated in late 1982, could not find a chief justice who would survive the blackballing by which senators could kill an objectionable appointment from their home districts.

 

Greenhill urged Clements to appoint Pope. But 14 Democratic senators pledged to block any appointment Clements made, essentially dooming it in the Senate. They argued that such an important appointment should be saved for incoming Gov. Mark White, the Democrat who beat Clements.

 

White gave unqualified support to Pope.

 

So Clements picked Pope, who had voted for White. Despite the opposition, Pope took the oath, then demanded that he get the prerogative of giving the State of the Judiciary speech.

 

In it Pope argued for reforms he had championed for years. He urged nonpartisan judicial elections and, to promote equal access to justice for the poor, approval of the so-called IOLTA program to pay for civil legal help for the poor with interest on lawyers’ common client-trust accounts. He argued for overhaul of what he considered Texas’ wasteful venue statutes that almost guaranteed two trials – one on the venue question and one on the merits.

 

In a chapter for his memoirs he described resisting offers for a deal to win the Senate’s approval. Pope had no plans to run for the chief justice position because he would turn 75, the mandatory retirement age for Texas judges, in the middle of another term. But he said senators wanted him to promise to resign after the Senate approved him to allow White’s appointee as chief justice to run as an incumbent in the next election.

 

Pope said no. Such a deal would be unethical, even illegal, he said. “If the public sees that I will make a deal to get a job and to keep a job,” he later wrote, “then maybe they’ll think I’ll make deals on other matters.”

 

Branch chuckled at the thought. “How could you complain about Jack Pope? It was brilliance by Clements. He picked someone who was unassailable.”

 

Pope’s force for judicial education began as soon as he donned his robe in Nueces County. As a new judge he set a goal.

 

“At that point,” he recalled, “I decided I was going to read legal literature, one chapter every night, seven nights a week, for 12 to 15 years.”

 

Years later, many of those books and more lined the shelves of his home library in Austin. Talking about his life, Jack Pope pulled a book from a section of library, a copy of Minimum Standards of Judicial Administration.

 

“This is my Bible,” he said.

 

It could have been instead one of four volumes of Jurisprudence by the great legal scholar Roscoe Pound or a copy of the Magna Carta story or one of three volumes of Law and Society. Or any of the others among hundreds of books packed floor to ceiling with biographies and treatises in a garage-sized library at his home in the hills above Tom Miller Dam.

 

“These,” he said of the books lining his walls, “are my friends.”

 

When he was on the appeals court, he wrote New York University Law School to ask whether it offered judicial education for intermediate-appellate judges. NYU had the only judicial-education program in the country, but limited it to state supreme court jurists.

 

Finding nothing, he worked for years for judicial education, assisted in founding the Texas Center for the Judiciary, a judicial-education institute, and signed the order mandating education for Texas judges.

 

But judicial education was only one of several judicial-administrative reforms he envisioned. In 1962, when he was on the appeals court, a State Bar committee he chaired drafted the first voluntary judicial-ethics code. In 1972, when he was on the Supreme Court, he drafted the first mandatory judicial conduct code for Texas judges.

 

Perhaps his greatest contribution to Texas law, however, was State v. Valmont Plantations, decided in 1961 while he was on the San Antonio Court of Appeals. In Valmont, Pope reevaluated a landmark water-rights case from three and a half decades before, found it laden with dicta and without analysis of Mexican and Spanish land grants even though those land grants should have been critical to the decision.

 

So Pope cast aside the notion that he was abandoning settled law, methodically demonstrating its fallacies. His Valmont decision was a proud legacy because the Texas Supreme Court adopted his opinion as its own, a rare move.

 

Valmont reassessed water rights conveyed by Spanish and Mexican land grants. It held, in a case by landowners along the Rio Grande suing for irrigation water from the new Falcon Reservoir on the Texas-Mexico border, that irrigation-water rights in the Lower Rio Grande Valley were not included in Mexican and Spanish land grants unless expressly mentioned in the grants.

 

When historical novelist James Michener researched water and its bearing on Texas history for his novel Texas, Branch recalled, Michener called on Pope to explain it.

 

“His researchers had figured out that he was water law,” Branch said.

 

In 1986, University of Texas law Professor Hans Baade honored Chief Justice Pope after his retirement with a law-review article titled, “The Historical Background of Texas Water Law – A Tribute to Jack Pope.”

 

Abilene Christian, Pepperdine, Oklahoma Christian and St. Mary’s universities awarded him honorary degrees.

 

In 2009 the Texas Center for Ethics and Professionalism presented its first Jack Pope Professionalism Award to Pope. In 2010 the State Bar’s Judicial Section honored him with a lifetime achievement award.

 

“Just about the time I was getting the hang of being a judge,” he said once, “I had to retire.”

 

In a quarter-century of retirement he kept active, studying and writing about the law and his family history, preparing books and papers for donation.

 

His was a familiar figure as he walked through his West Austin neighborhood.

 

At 96, determined to walk 9.6 miles for his birthday, an Austin television station featured him preparing by stretching lengthwise across his legs to touch his toes. High school athletes would have been envious.

 

McConnico perhaps put it best.

 

“He was a man for all seasons.”

 

 

Tags:  Jack Pope  State Bar of Texas  Texas Supreme Court 

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SABA Holiday Hours

Posted By Administration, Friday, December 23, 2016

Happy holidays from the San Antonio Bar!

 

Please note our holiday hours:

 

Friday, December 23

Early close at 3:00 p.m. in observance of Christmas Eve

 

Monday, December 26

Office closed in observance of Christmas Day

 

Tuesday, December 27-Thursday, December 29

Regular office hours

 

Friday, December 30

Early close at 3:00 p.m. in observance of New Year's Eve

 

Monday, January 2

Office closed in observance of New Year's Day

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Meet a Member: Holiday Special Spotlight

Posted By Administration, Friday, December 23, 2016
Updated: Thursday, December 22, 2016

Enjoy some festive comedy and watch bar leaders introduce our newest member. The SA Bar sends many thanks to Board Members Marty Truss, Ty Sheehan and Justice Rebeca Martinez who star in this parody along with Past President Judge Larry Noll. This video was made possible because of your prowess acting and good humor! 

 

 

Tags:  Judge Noll  Justice Rebeca Martinez  Marty Truss  Monthly Luncheon  SABA  Ty Sheehan  Ty-Rex 

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President's Message: Love Your Lawyer Day

Posted By Bobby Barrera, SABA President, Friday, November 4, 2016

I must assume that I am not the only lawyer who didn't know that by proclamation of the ABA Law Practice Division Council (I didn’t know that there was one of those either!), the first Friday of every November has been decreed to be “Love Your Lawyer Day.” Surprisingly, this tradition is now 15 years old and has been the subject of both annual celebration and criticism. The alleged purpose is to thank lawyers for all they have done for the public, not only on an individual level, but also for the contributions lawyers have made in the shaping of American civilization and the protection of our God-given rights. There may be a lawyer reading this who has already asked internally, “Can Bobby say ‘God’ gave us these rights? Who will be offended by this statement?” Therein lies the inherent conflict in the redemption of the reputation of our profession and its purpose. As a general rule, we exist to resolve conflicts of opinion and the interpretation of our interaction not only with each other, but with everything earthly and heavenly as well. This is no easy task as evidenced by the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States being split 5-4 on so many of the opinions which control our lives and dictate our human interaction. These men and women, arguably the most ably qualified legal minds in the country, rarely interpret the written law and the evidence to the same conclusion. It is axiomatic that for every winner, there is a loser. Accordingly, someone is always despising their lawyer or the opposing party’s lawyer. Or, they are all (including the lawyers) loathing the judge who most generally is also a lawyer! So to what end is the purpose of “Love Your Lawyer Day” other than to sell coffee mugs and marketing gimmicks?

 

Many years ago I was fortunate enough to hear then-Congressman Charlie Gonzales give a speech about the privilege of being a lawyer. It is truly one of the best and most professionally moving speeches that I have ever heard. The message was more artfully conveyed by him in 45 minutes than I can do now in one sentence, but, put simply, it was that we, as lawyers, are blessed not only with the opportunity, but, more importantly, with the responsibility to champion the rights and freedoms of all persons in this country. We have the right and the duty to stand up to the most powerful government in the world and tell it that it is wrong. We, as lawyers, told the Supreme Court that “separate but equal” should not be the law as it demeaned human dignity and they listened. We, as lawyers, have the responsibility to protect the weak and underprivileged from those who would do them wrong for financial gain, just ask Johns Manville and the asbestos companies. We, as lawyers, have the responsibility to protect the falsely accused from politically, racially or vindictively motivated prosecution — just ask Michael Morton, the “San Antonio Four” or Alan Brown. We, as lawyers, have the ability to change the laws that others with self-interests in mind would cause us to endure. 

 

In short, we have the responsibility to protect the American way of life with the application of the law and our creative, reasoning legal minds. However, we accept the premise that with this responsibility comes consequences for both the successes of our efforts as well as our failures. I know that I have walked back to my office from the courthouse on numerous occasions questioning internally the true meaning of the word “justice” in the application of my responsibilities to my criminally-charged client versus my responsibility to the community in which my family and I live. When successful, my client may “love” me, but those who he may have offended certainly revile me and what I do for a living. The same holds true for those lawyers who seek to prevent Christian prayers in our schools, who seek to force the use of gender-specific bathrooms by everyone, who seek to protect the rights of those who kneel during the National Anthem, who seek to protect billion-dollar corporations from responsibility for the defective products which they sell...the list goes on and on. Again, the understandable contradiction between the responsibilities of our profession and our public reputation remains unaltered by the outcome of the legal situations which we orchestrate to benefit our clients. Without regard to the virtue or sanctity of the goal we ultimately seek to obtain in litigation, in the eyes of the general public, the fact that we fight the fight is enough to impugn our reputation and their perception of us. More so, the morality of what we do and our utility to the public is continuously derided in humor, which rarely rises to the level of even a “courtesy chuckle.”

 

So it is with good reason that neither I nor most of you have never heard of “Love Your Lawyer Day” because we, as lawyers, didn’t assume the responsibilities and the duties that we have so that we could be lauded and praised as Hollywood celebrities are by the general public. No, we do what we do to protect the American Dream and our way of life without regard to the consequences to our reputation or our conflicting introspection. We are the “special forces” of the civilian legal world and the United States Constitution is our arsenal. These United States of America have the greatest legal system in the world, and we, as lawyers, are privileged and duty bound to protect it. Godspeed. 

 

Tags:  Bobby Barrera  Love Your Lawyer Day 

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National Love Your Lawyer Day History

Posted By Administration, Thursday, October 20, 2016
Updated: Friday, November 4, 2016

Mark your calendars, lawyers across the nation will be celebrating Love Your Lawyer Day this November 4, 2016. 

 

According to the American Bar Association, "lawyers have consistently been the target of verbal bashing, derogatory portrayals in popular culture and literature rife with lawyer bashing" for hundreds of years. Love Your Lawyer Day was created by the ABA to reverse negative stigma surrounding the legal community. Section 1 of the resolution asks that the public say, Thank you, and honor all the good lawyers contribute to our communities. Ways to celebrate may include: sending a card, flowers or gifts, taking them out to lunch, making a donation to a charity in their name and, last but not least, sending them a testimonial of their work. Lawyers may not be asking for recognition but who wouldn't love thoughtful appreciation? 

 

Another initiative of Love Your Lawyer Day encourages attorneys to perform one hour of pro bono work or donate the equivalent of one billable hour to their favorite charity. SABA's Community Justice Program is designed for lawyers to give back to their community by offering to take on pro bono cases. To date, CJP has matched more than 8,500 pro bono cases to volunteer attorneys! Whether you're a member of the legal community or the general public, you can make sure charities win big.

 

Be sure to show your enthusiasm and appreciation for the legal community on your social media accounts and use #LoveYourLawyerDay. 

 

 

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